Special Lectures

Simon says: ‘The Wire’ creator to give special evening lecture on ‘Crime and Punishment’

Simon says: ‘The Wire’ creator to give special evening lecture on ‘Crime and Punishment’

In an effort to describe David Simon’s work on “The Wire,” critics have drawn parallels from Shakespeare to Dickens to David Chase of “The Sopranos.” But the reference point Simon often uses for his work is similar to how he describes contemporary American society: the Greek tragedy.

Both Simon and television critics have compared his widely acclaimed HBO drama “The Wire” to a Greek play, with its dark themes, social commentary and complete lack of hesitation to kill off characters.

Justice Kennedy: ‘We must know our heritage and our history’

Justice Kennedy: ‘We must know our heritage and our history’

In the eyes of Supreme Court Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, Americans take their freedom for granted. As he spoke to the Chautauquans packed in and around the Hall of Philosophy at 3:30 p.m. Monday, he drew upon history and tradition to illustrate how vital it is that Americans engage in the discussion of freedom.
He admitted that in his younger years, he thought democracy could be given like a gift. He joked that some people think they can introduce democracy to a country, wipe their hands and say goodbye, and then democracy will be magically “installed.”

Kennedy speaks to Week Five theme in special presentation

Kennedy speaks to Week Five theme in special presentation

Anthony M. Kennedy, associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, will offer remarks on the Week Five theme, “The Pursuit of Happiness,” in a special lecture at 3:30 p.m. today in the Hall of Philosophy.

Nominated to the Supreme Court by President Ronald Reagan, Kennedy took his seat Feb. 18, 1988. In his 25 years on the bench, he has written the court’s majority opinion on many landmark cases, including United States v. Windsor in 2013, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission in 2010, Kennedy v. Louisiana and Boumediene v. Bush in 2008 and Lawrence v. Texas in 2003.

Lincoln Applied Ethics Series concludes today

Lincoln Applied Ethics Series concludes today

Rothenberg joins four Arizona State University colleagues in a panel discussion at 4 p.m. today in the Hall of Philosophy, the third and final program of the 12th annual Lincoln Applied Ethics Series at Chautauqua Institution. Jason Robert, interim director of the ASU Lincoln Center for Applied Ethics, will moderate the panel, which features Rothenberg; LaDawn Haglund, associate professor of justice and social inquiry; Braden Allenby, professor of civil and environmental engineering and of law; and Amy Landis, associate professor in the ASU School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment.

Knight to speak on Addams, Chautauqua’s role in her ideology

Knight to speak on Addams, Chautauqua’s role in her ideology

Chautauqua audiences knew Jane Addams well, as the social and political activist made a number of appearances on the Institution’s lecture platform. Louise Knight, who has authored two books on Addams, will describe how Addams’ Chautauqua presentations are linked to some of the ideas that appeared in her later publications.

Knight is speaking at 3:30 p.m. today in the Hall of Christ as part of the Oliver Archives Heritage Lecture Series.

Former solicitor general Fried to survey recent Supreme Court terms

Former solicitor general Fried to survey recent Supreme Court terms

Week Three’s Interfaith Lectures theme — “Emancipation: Where Do We Go From Here?” — goes hand in hand with the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent rulings on the Voting Rights Act of 1965, the Defense of Marriage Act and Proposition 8. There’s no better time to bring to Chautauqua Institution a Supreme Court expert who can shed light on the complex machinations of the Supreme Court and the motivations of its justices.

CBS White House correspondent Plante to reflect on modern politics

CBS White House correspondent Plante to reflect on modern politics

As a CBS correspondent, Bill Plante has seen the thick of American history: the battlelines of Vietnam, Pope John Paul II’s 1979 visit and the workings of every White House administration since the inauguration of former President Ronald Reagan.

Plante will focus on the Obama administration in his talk “The Political System in the Wake of the 2012 Elections” at 3 p.m. Saturday in the Hall of Philosophy, part of the Women’s Club Contemporary Issues Forum speaker series.

Even while being interviewed over the phone, Plante was stationed inside the White House press room, armed and ready for the next update on the Obama family’s visit to Africa. Plante, the senior White House correspondent for “CBS This Morning,” said his Saturday lecture will mostly address current events. He hopes to change audience perceptions on the politics behind White House inner-workings.

Ariely shares ways we lie to everyone, especially selves

Ariely shares ways we lie to everyone, especially selves

Chautauquans enjoyed Dan Ariely so much last year that the Institution booked him again this season — not only for a single lecture, either. From Monday to Wednesday this week, Ariely taught a three-day special seminar on irrational behavior.

At 4 p.m. today in the Hall of Philosophy, the Duke University psychology and behavioral economics professor will take to the podium again, this time presenting his latest book, The (Honest) Truth About Dishonesty: How We Lie to Everyone — Especially Ourselves. A book signing will follow the presentation.