Posts Tagged 'Braden Allenby'

Lincoln Applied Ethics Series concludes today

Lincoln Applied Ethics Series concludes today

Rothenberg joins four Arizona State University colleagues in a panel discussion at 4 p.m. today in the Hall of Philosophy, the third and final program of the 12th annual Lincoln Applied Ethics Series at Chautauqua Institution. Jason Robert, interim director of the ASU Lincoln Center for Applied Ethics, will moderate the panel, which features Rothenberg; LaDawn Haglund, associate professor of justice and social inquiry; Braden Allenby, professor of civil and environmental engineering and of law; and Amy Landis, associate professor in the ASU School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment.

Ethics lectures tackle nature of conflict, greenwashing

Ethics lectures tackle nature of conflict, greenwashing

Day two of the three-day Lincoln Ethics seminar will bring Arizona State University’s Braden Allenby, professor of civil and environmental engineering and of law, and Amy Landis, associate professor in the School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, to the Hall of Philosophy.

Panel to present findings of council on technology, laws of war

Panel to present findings of council on technology, laws of war

A panel led by Braden Allenby, Wednesday’s 10:45 a.m. lecturer, will discuss “Implications of Emerging Military and Security Technologies for the Laws of War” at 10:45 a.m. Saturday in the Hall of Philosophy.

The council, made of 17 consuls from various fields, spent the past week meeting and discussing the impact of new technological developments on traditional laws of war. Representatives of the council will present the results of their weeklong discussion, including new questions, perspectives or conclusions that may have emerged.

Allenby and his co-chair, George Lucas of the United States Naval Postgraduate School, will be among the representatives to present the council’s summary. They plan to take questions and hope to begin a dialogue on the topic.

Allenby: Evolve with technology, or become obsolete

Allenby: Evolve with technology, or become obsolete

People have grown up to believe that self is built within them. But Braden Allenby argues that the Cartesian perspective is wrong.

To Allenby, Lincoln Professor of Engineering and Ethics at Arizona State University, self is the ability to adapt and integrate with the environment as it changes.

In his lecture, titled “Slow Sunset of the Self,” Allenby spoke about the meaning of self in a technological world and how multitasking has allowed younger generations to adapt to it. His Wednesday morning lecture in the Amphitheater was the third of Week Six, themed “Digital Identity.”

The world currently faces a digital divide between those who have access to computers and those who do not. One solution to close the gap has been to provide computers for the underprivileged. But there is another angle to consider.

Allenby: Destabilizing the self

Allenby: Destabilizing the self

Galileo had a major problem. It was not just that the Dominicans were locked in a struggle with the Jesuits over difficult matters of doctrine and intellectual leadership of the Church, and he had gotten himself crosswise in that messy conflict. It was not just that his book, Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems, published in 1632, was — foolishly, and perhaps arrogantly — written in such a way as to make an enemy out of Pope Urban VIII, who had heretofore been his friend. And it was not just that his argument that the sun, not the earth, was the center of the solar system appeared to violate the clear language of the Bible (e.g., Psalm 104:5, New International Version: “He set the earth on its foundations; it can never be moved”). No, it was that his heliocentric theory violated the clear evidence of the senses. People all around the world, every day, watched the sun move across the sky. They were not blown off the planet by the winds that movement at the rate Galileo claimed would certainly generate. The earth stood solid underneath them, and the sun moved above them; to suggest otherwise was simply nonsense.

Week Six explores our digital selves

Week Six explores our digital selves

The morning lectures of Week Six, themed “Digital Identity,” will explore the physiological, cultural and psychological consequences of living digitally and examine how our online presence shapes the concept of self, demands for privacy and the way we relate to one another.

Applied ethics series to examine country’s fallen standards

Applied ethics series to examine country’s fallen standards

If there is nothing more patriotic than dissonance, Chautauquans will certainly celebrate Independence Day in good form with a series of special lectures focusing on U.S. government dysfunction that starts this afternoon. Four speakers from the Lincoln Center for Applied Ethics at Arizona State University will lead the Lincoln Applied Ethics Lectures at 4 p.m. today through Wednesday at the Hall of Philosophy.