Posts Tagged 'Devotional Hour'

Hunter: ‘If love is to be effective, it has to be exclusive’

Hunter: ‘If love is to be effective, it has to be exclusive’

The Rev. Joel Hunter continued his series on “Odd Couples” at the Wednesday morning 9:15 a.m. Devotional Hour.

“These odd couples hold our lives in dynamic tension as we grow into the creatures God made us to be,” Hunter said.

His title was “Odd Couples: Believers and Unbelievers” and his text was John 17:13-20.

“Unbelievers are people who don’t believe like you do,” he said. The congregation laughed. “Becky, my wife, sat next to a rabbi on Sunday who said we need to be more radical about our own faith. By radical he meant rooted so that we become more the kind of person we are.”

Hunter: ‘God’s revelation comes by the Word and the world’

Hunter: ‘God’s revelation comes by the Word and the world’

“We are always learning about science and religion. They are not separate spheres; God has two major sources of revelation. In Scripture, we find specific revelation, and in nature, we find general revelation,” said the Rev. Joel Hunter at the Tuesday morning 9:15 a.m. Devotional Hour. His text was Romans 1:20, and his topic was “Odd Couples: Faith and Science.”

He noted that the sermon continued on his theme of complementarity. God made the world for differences to combine to be complete; they can go together, but they should never marry. Hunter said that his wife was a biology teacher, and he is a preacher, and they agreed to never combine their fields of expertise in their marriage.

Hunter: ‘God is not confined by institutions’

Hunter: ‘God is not confined by institutions’

“There are some odd couples who can date but who should never marry,” said the Rev. Joel Hunter at the Monday morning 9:15 a.m. Devotional Hour. His topic was “Odd Couples: Church and State,” and his text was Romans 13:1-4.

“There are some couples who can date but should never marry. This is true of the church and the state. This is why Jefferson referred to the wall of separation between church and state,” Hunter said. “Keep this picture in mind. The state is a well-intentioned bully. He knows strength and force. The church is a bipolar church lady. She tries to help people across the street, but if you make her angry, she will hurt you. The nature of the relationship between church and state is one of continual dialogue, but they should never marry.”

Hunter: ‘We need to find people who irritate us, who won’t always agree with us’

Hunter: ‘We need to find people who irritate us, who won’t always agree with us’

“It was my first day at the insane asylum. I was just 25, and I was working on my doctorate and signed up for a year of clinical pastoral education,” began The Rev. Joel Hunter, Week Nine chaplain at Chautauqua.

Hunter is the senior pastor at Northland, A Church Distributed, in Central Florida. His title was “Searching for Complements,” and his text was Genesis 2:15, 18-23.

“It was in Indianapolis and a place for the criminally insane. It was all ancient brick and it felt like every Alfred Hitchcock movie I had ever watched. I was overwhelmed. As I went looking for the administration building, I passed a parade of attendants leading some of the patients.

Hunter’s chaplaincy closes season

Hunter’s chaplaincy closes season

The Rev. Joel Hunter, senior pastor at Northland, A Church Distributed, will be the Chautauqua chaplain for Week Nine. Hunter will preach at the 10:45 a.m. Sunday Service of Worship and Sermon in the Amphitheater and will speak about his faith journey at the 5 p.m. Vespers in the Hall of Philosophy. He will preach at the weekday 9:15 a.m. Devotional Hour in the Amphitheater.

The title of Sunday’s sermon is “Searching for Complements,” and the sermon text is Genesis 2:15, 18-23.

Lind: ‘There is always enough of whatever we need’

Lind: ‘There is always enough of whatever we need’

“We are trapped in the scarcity myth,” said the Rev. Tracey Lind at the 9:15 a.m. Monday Devotional Hour. “We have bought into the falsity of scarcity when God has provided enough for us not only to survive, but thrive.”

Her texts were 2 Kings 4:42-44 and John 6:1-14, and her title was “Busting the Myth of Scarcity.”

Lind to preach from Amp pulpit during Week Eight

Lind to preach from Amp pulpit during Week Eight

The Very Rev. Tracey Lind will be the Chautauqua chaplain for Week Eight. She will speak at the 10:45 a.m. Sunday Service of Worship and Sermon in the Amphitheater, on the topic “When God Pitches a Tent.” Later on Sunday, Lind will share her faith journey at the 5 p.m. Vespers in the Hall of Philosophy, and then will preach at 9:15 a.m. Monday through Friday at the Devotional Hour. Her topics will include “Busting the Myths of Scarcity,” “Family Values,” “Love Your Enemies,” “Was Jesus a Radical?” and “Keeping Sabbath.”

Since 2000, Lind has served as dean of Trinity Cathedral in Cleveland, Ohio. She earned her Master of Divinity from Union Theological Seminary in the City of New York and her Master of Community Planning from the University of Cincinnati.

Butler: ‘It is about character, conviction, the core of our being’

Butler: ‘It is about character, conviction, the core of our being’

“The battle lines are drawn; there is a cosmic battle in the background of the temptations of Jesus,” said the Rev. Don Darius Butler at the Friday morning 9:15 a.m. Devotional Hour. “The kingdoms of the world, symbolized by Rome, are against the Kingdom of Heaven embodied in Jesus. Who wins will determine our options in the human family. Will it be the more excellent way or a debased human condition?”

Butler’s sermon title was “A Counter Witness to the Common,” and his scripture was Matthew 4:1-11.

The three temptations involve the misuse of power for self-gratification; the will to self, which runs counter to God’s will; and personal gain that compromises integrity.

Butler: ‘In Jesus, the worship of God is uncompromised’

Butler: ‘In Jesus, the worship of God is uncompromised’

“These We Have in Common” was the title of the Rev. Don Darius Butler’s sermon for the 9:15 a.m. Thursday Devotional Hour. His text was Matthew 4:1-11.

“This narrative is usually tucked away in Lent, when the faithful face their own humanity and their common problems,” Butler said. “But Jesus struggled against the forces of the world, and no one has ever been this vulnerable, no one has had a one-on-one encounter with the Devil, no one has faced the test so directly.”

Yet we have much in common with Jesus in what we face in our everyday lives. The three temptations Jesus faced shaped his character, his identity and his ministry. The first temptation, to turn stones into bread, is the temptation to misuse our power, Butler said.

Butts: ‘Anyone who believes in the power of God is on our side’

Butts: ‘Anyone who believes in the power of God is on our side’

“I am here today to encourage the faithful in the work we have to do. There is opposition to God in the world — not denial, but opposition. Satan is pressing his cause, and it is time for the faithful to line up for spiritual warfare. It is time, as St. Paul said, to put on the whole armor of God,” said the Rev. Calvin Butts at Wednesday’s 9:15 a.m. Devotional Hour. His topic was “For Such a Time as This,” and his text was I John 5:4-5.