Posts Tagged 'Google'

COMMENTARY: Institution must recognize importance of technology

COMMENTARY: Institution must recognize importance of technology

Throughout the 2013 Season, select speakers at Chautauqua Institution — specifically chaplains in residence — have cast technological innovation in a pessimistic light. But it is not the criticism of smartphones and video games that is problematic. Rather, it is the sheer lack of a response to this criticism which serves as a reminder: The Institution has historically offered very little programming on technology and culture.

Google brings brainstorming project to Chautauqua

Google brings brainstorming project to Chautauqua

Last Tuesday night, approximately 40 young minds gathered in the Pier Building to “Solve For X.” A brainstorming project run by Google[x] — the arm of the technology giant responsible for the self-driving car and Google Glass — Solve For X brought 17- to 24-year-olds together for an hour of presentations by three innovators, followed by a half-hour of brainstorming about each innovator’s idea. Google describes the process as the meeting point of a huge problem, a radical solution to the problem and the use of breakthrough technology.

Smith: Digital natives leverage technology in a way never possible before

Smith: Digital natives leverage technology in a way never possible before

Though Megan Smith’s current place of residence is in Silicon Valley, the vice president of Google[x] has her roots on the grounds of Chautauqua Institution.

“It’s nice to be home,” she told the crowd at the Monday morning lecture in the Amphitheater. “Traveling with all of you has been an incredible experience.”

Once a participant in the Chautauqua Boys’ and Girls’ Club, Smith was back to jumpstart the second week of morning lectures with the theme of “The Next Greatest Generation.”

Network makes us all ‘Next Greatest Generation,’ Smith says

Network makes us all ‘Next Greatest Generation,’ Smith says

Megan Smith put Chautauqua on the map — well, digitally anyway.

The vice president of Google[x] was responsible for the various vehicles that drove around the Institution’s grounds last year gathering images for Google Maps Street View, which went live last month.

Smith, who will open this week’s morning lectures at 10:45 a.m. today in the Amphitheater, knows a lot about “The Next Greatest Generation.” And she said that the audience already knows about this generation as well, seeing as they are a part of it.

Eig bytes into future of writing in Brown Bag

Eig bytes into future of writing in Brown Bag

In what some refer to as the most significant federal decision since the New Deal, on June 28 the United States Supreme Court affirmed the constitutionality of President Obama’s Affordable Care Act in a 5-4 vote. When the news first broke, organizations immediately took to Twitter to broadcast the decision as Chief Justice John Roberts read the ruling.

With floods of tweets about the verdict, some news outlets chose to be first instead of verifying what they reported, which led CNN and Fox News to publish false information.

Writer-in-residence Jonathan Eig said journalists have often made mistakes, but the digital realm allows those to happen at a faster rate.

The Week Six morning lecture platform theme is “Digital Identity,” and Eig will present a Brown Bag Lecture, “Googling Your Way to Good Writing,” at 12:15 p.m. today on the Alumni Hall porch.

Lithwick: People have forsaken privacy for digital identity

Lithwick: People have forsaken privacy for digital identity

In exchange for a digital identity, people have given up their privacy.

Google has kept archives of emails sent and friends’ replies for the last six years. Facebook tracks people’s activities all over the Internet, even when they are logged off. And Twitter taps into entire address books when people use the “find friends” option and archives it for 18 months.

For those who do not use Facebook or Twitter, that does not mean no one is watching them, said Dahlia Lithwick, who reports on the law and the U.S. Supreme Court as a senior editor of Slate magazine. People can be tracked by turning on their phones, using an E-ZPass or using a Starbucks card.

Moss: Analog religion can gain insights, strength from new digital technologies

Moss: Analog religion can gain insights, strength from new digital technologies

Have you ever owned a 78, 45 or 33? Have you called an audio device a HiFi or a record player? Have you owned an 8-track? Have you mailed a letter, or looked up a phone number in the phonebook? Have you been to the library — for books?

If you answered yes to any of those questions, then you are an analog immigrant, the Rev. Otis Moss III told his audience during Tuesday’s 2 p.m. Interfaith Lecture in the Hall of Philosophy.

In this week’s second religious lecture on the Week Six theme, “The Life of Faith and the Digital Age,” Moss discussed the societal clash of the “analog immigrants” and the “digital natives” in a lecture titled “God, Google and iPods: Digital Faith and Analog Religion.” He argued that our religious society is separated by an understanding of technology — there are the digital natives, who were born in the ’70s, ’80s and ’90s, and who live in a world in which technology is based on the binary codes — and the analog immigrants, people born earlier who are accustomed to wave technology and stationary forms of technology.

Google takes to Chautauqua streets to provide new online view

Google takes to Chautauqua streets to provide new online view

Later this year, Chautauqua will virtually open its gates to Internet viewers to peruse its red brick lanes and sandy shores. Today, Chautauqua opens its gates to the Google team.

This week, Google cameras in vans, trikes and trolleys hit the streets of Chautauqua to take pictures for Google Maps Street View.

The Street View feature lets online users to search a location and see a panoramic, 360-degree view of a point on a street. Now, viewers from around the world will have the opportunity to experience Chautauqua Institution, even if they can’t visit in person.

The Google Team has worked closely with Chautauqua through Megan J. Smith and the Institution’s Chief Marketing Officer and Vice President George Murphy. Smith, who spent her summers at Chautauqua, is now vice president of new business development at Google and general manager of Google.org.