Posts Tagged 'Lori Humphreys'

At 19 Wiley, the home that escaped time

At 19 Wiley, the home that escaped time

Edith and Steve Benson’s Chautauqua cottage sits at 19 Wiley, surrounded by an aged picket fence. Pushing open the gate, walking under the arched trellis draped in akebia and along a short curved stone walkway dripping with yellow roses, blue Russian Sage and the hardy remnant of a purple clematis up to the Benson’s porch is akin to visiting a home from a bygone era.

The Women Behind the Memorials: Eleanor Roosevelt: A woman of Chautauqua

The Women Behind the Memorials: Eleanor Roosevelt: A woman of Chautauqua

There are three observations, among many, gleaned from reading The Chautauquan Daily reporting of Eleanor Roosevelt’s eight visits to Chautauqua from 1927-1937. First: how farsighted her concerns and comments were, particularly in the July 7, 1930, and the July 25, 1933, speeches. Second: the reporting, which inadvertently describes the contrast in the freedom of movement Roosevelt enjoyed to the impenetrable gauze of security which wraps national political figures today. Third: how vivid and observant the reporting was, especially Elizabeth Hall’s July 26, 1933, Daily “Ground Wires” column.

The Women Behind the Memorials: The woman who bought the Amphitheater

The Women Behind the Memorials: The woman who bought the Amphitheater

Geraldine Gebbie Bellinger bought Chautauqua’s Amphitheater in 1935. Well, to be precise, she joined her daughter, Janet, and sister, Marion Bertram Gebbie, and made a $5,000 sentimental purchase of the Amp. It was a donation to the “Save Chautauqua Fund” and was one of the larger single contributions to the three-year effort to rescue the Institution from its creditors.

Remembering the Lodge: Chautauqua’s own hospital, 1912–1922

Remembering the Lodge: Chautauqua’s own hospital, 1912–1922

This week, 21st-century Chautauquans explore “Health Care: Reform and Innovation.” Health concerns were also very much on the minds of Chautauquans near the end of the 19th century. Today’s discussion is one of a complex, sophisticated health care system; in the 19th century, it was a discussion of water purification and sewage systems. Today, it’s asking how to organize an effective, affordable health care system; in the 19th century, it was asking how to eliminate contagious disease and treat Chautauquans who may be far from home.

Nancy Richards: A biography in glass

Nancy Richards: A biography in glass

Chautauquan Nancy Richards is a woman of many facets: minister’s wife, mother, former president of the United Methodist House and accomplished stained glass artist.

Conversations with her reveal a woman of character, wit, intelligence, directness and profound Christian faith. Her life and art are linked, each reflecting the other — a biography in glass. [w/ SLIDESHOW]