Posts Tagged 'oliver archives heritage lecture series'

Chautauqua Sacred Music: A presentation of five figures

Chautauqua Sacred Music: A presentation of five figures

The sound of an organ harmonizing with human voices has always been an integral part of the Chautauqua experience. Clergy, choir directors and choir members who visited the Institution enjoyed singing hymns in a new environment with new accompaniment and often with new music.

Jared Jacobsen, organist and coordinator of worship and sacred music, and Marlie Bendiksen, research assistant at the Oliver Archives, have documented the history of sacred music at the Institution from a number of perspectives and have presented their findings in recent years, inviting the audience to sing along.

Grant, a strong and gentle man who enjoyed novels

Grant, a strong and gentle man who enjoyed novels

The experiment at Fair Point did not happen without help. John Heyl Vincent and Lewis Miller knew people — they had earned attention.

For example, Vincent knew Ulysses S. Grant, a general, a parishioner, a president. And through Vincent’s arrangement, Grant came to Chautauqua in 1875 while he was president. His visit earned attention for the fledgling Institution and could be credited with much of the Institution’s early success.

To speak of Grant, his early association with Vincent and Chautauqua, and to share his early findings as he researches and writes a book about Grant, Ronald White will give a talk titled “Grant at West Point: ‘Much of the time, I’m sorry to say, was devoted to novels.’ ”

As part of the Oliver Archives Heritage Lecture Series, White will speak today at 3:30 p.m. in the Hall of Christ. White is an award winning author — his most recent book, A. Lincoln: A Biography, was published in 2009 and is a New York Times, Washington Post and Los Angeles Times bestseller.

To believe or not to believe: Schmitz discusses Chautauqua and atheism

To believe or not to believe: Schmitz discusses Chautauqua and atheism

To believe. To have faith. It can be difficult.

H.L. Mencken said “Faith may be defined briefly as an illogical belief in the occurrence of the improbable.”

St. Francis of Assisi said, “Where there is hatred let me sow love. Where there is injury, pardon. Where there is doubt, faith.”

So much for the gray area: Now consider atheists.

To put a historical perspective on the enigma of belief, Jon Schmitz, archivist and historian for Chautauqua, will present “Atheism at Chautauqua” at 3:30 p.m. today in the Hall of Christ.

Roots of Chautauqua: radical to see and to understand

Roots of Chautauqua: radical to see and to understand

It takes one to know one; that is truism. To see, one must understand; to understand, one must see: that is truth. Or is it French? Or is it radical?

“Too often, ‘radical’ has been taken to be someone who is left-wing or using extreme means to accomplish reform,” said Jon Schmitz, Chautauqua archivist and historian. “But it really means someone going to the root of the matter to solve a problem.”

Schmitz will present “Four Radicals at Chautauqua: Fr. Edward McGlynn on the Single Tax, Arabella B. Buckley on Modernism in Religion, John Dewey on Education, Arnold Schoenberg and Serialism.”

Part of the Oliver Archives Heritage Lecture Series, the presentation is at 3:30 p.m. today in the Hall of Christ.