Posts Tagged 'Week Seven'

Sullivan: Honor code, communication cultivates culture of honor, integrity

Sullivan: Honor code, communication cultivates culture of honor, integrity

Honor codes within the education system can instill a long-lasting culture of honor and integrity.

Teresa A. Sullivan, president of the University of Virginia, framed Friday’s morning lecture in the Amphitheater around how communities can maintain a culture of those traits to end Week Seven, themed “The Ethics of Cheating.”

The millennial generation, which includes anyone born since 1980, can be characterized by several key traits, Sullivan said. Those individuals are more confident, more team- and peer-oriented, more inclined to rely on peers for reinforcement and approval, face increased pressure to succeed, and focused on the future and long-term career success.

Davis: Penalties for cheating should always be tougher than for not meeting a goal

Davis: Penalties for cheating should always be tougher than for not meeting a goal

When the report of a cheating scandal in the Atlanta Public Schools District was released, Erroll B. Davis Jr. viewed the scandal as a failure in leadership.

Two investigators had looked into the extensive amount of cheating on standardized testing in the school district. Their 800-page report was released in June 2011, just days after Davis became interim superintendent.

APS became home to the largest cheating scandal in United States history, Davis said.

He shared the story about the scandal unfolding, his views on what caused it, and what the community is now doing, during Thursday’s morning lecture in the Amphitheater as part of Week Seven, themed “The Ethics of Cheating.”

Heiman, McHugh present contrasting perspectives on infidelity

Heiman, McHugh present contrasting perspectives on infidelity

Julia Heiman thinks affairs are driven by the stories people tell themselves to justify their actions. Paul McHugh thinks people are confused about sex.

Heiman and McHugh individually spoke about their views on extramarital affairs before having a conversation with each other during Tuesday’s morning lecture in the Amphitheater for Week Seven, themed “The Ethics of Cheating.”

Bemporad: Religion must reclaim sense of the holy, speak for the future

Bemporad: Religion must reclaim sense of the holy, speak for the future

“I do not think that one can claim that human beings are by nature either wholly good or wholly evil. We have the potential for both. We can either be good, or we can be not so good, and the culture and education that we’re exposed to can elicit one or the other,” Rabbi Jack Bemporad said Monday in the Hall of Philosophy.

In the first Interfaith Lecture on the Week Seven theme, “Creating Cultures of Honor and Integrity,” Bemporad discussed whether there are universal standards that define acceptable behavior for societies and individuals, what standards are “healthfully human,” how those standards can be emphasized, and the role of religion in encouraging those standards. The title of his lecture was “The Challenge of Creating Cultures of Honor and Integrity.”

Ariely: Small-scale cheating allows us to still feel good about ourselves

Ariely: Small-scale cheating allows us to still feel good about ourselves

The consequences of our actions have little to no effect on dishonesty. Studies have shown even the death penalty does not influence crime levels.

Rather than thinking of the costs and benefits of their actions, people find ways to rationalize them.

“What happens is that on one hand, we want to look at the mirror and feel good about ourselves. We want to feel that we’re honest, wonderful people,” said Dan Ariely during Monday’s morning lecture. “On the other hand, we want to benefit from cheating. That’s our selfish impulses.”

Ariely, the James. B. Duke Professor of Psychology and Behavioral Economics at Duke University, kicked off Week Seven, “The Ethics of Cheating,” with a lecture about people’s use of rationalism to justify dishonesty. Throughout his lecture, titled “Free Beer,” he shared several experiments conducted by his team at Duke University.

Week Seven lectures tackle ‘The Ethics of Cheating’

Week Seven lectures tackle ‘The Ethics of Cheating’

Chautauqua’s lecture platforms in Week Seven will examine honesty and integrity in public life and seek to understand how society lands on certain ethical standards — and how people rationalize skirting those standards. The morning lectures will show how cheating and dishonest behavior affect personal relationships, sports and academe, and also how it costs businesses thousands of dollars every year, a cost passed on to consumers.

Week Seven at Writers’ Center hones in on dishonesty, food, creativity, cheating

Week Seven at Writers’ Center hones in on dishonesty, food, creativity, cheating

“The Ethics of Cheating” is Week Seven’s morning lecture platform theme, and poet-in-residence Julia Kasdorf brings dishonesty to the forefront of her workshop and lecture.

She will present a Brown Bag lecture, “Metaphor, the Artful Lie,” at 12:15 p.m. Tuesday on the Alumni Hall porch, which coincides with her weeklong “Lies that Tell the Truth” workshop.

Matthew Goodman, prose writer-in-residence, will present a Brown Bag lecture that could encourage Chautauquans to “ethically cheat” on their diets in “From Plate to Page: Food as History, Food as Literature” at 12:15 p.m. Friday on the Alumni Hall porch. He will also discuss how food carries history.

From the President: Column by Thomas Becker

From the President: Column by Thomas Becker

Saturday night in the Amphitheater, we will celebrate musical theater as the Chautauqua Symphony Orchestra, led by our own Stuart Chafetz, joins with the Chautauqua Opera Company’s Opera Apprentices and Studio Artists for a production they title, “Water Matters: Broadway — The Great Wet Way.” The music is from Gilbert and Sullivan, Kern and Hammerstein, Sondheim and Weidman, Lerner and Lowe — a “who’s who” of American musical theater. The extracts or the works’ themes relate to water. The vocal talents on display will be the eight Apprentice Artists who will carry the individual roles and the 18 Studio Artists supplying the choral work. All of those talented musicians were selected for this summer’s program by the opera company’s Artistic and General Director, Jay Lesenger, and his veteran team. Lesenger has a genuine gift for recognizing the combination of vocal talent and dramatic interpretation. He leads the company through an astonishingly rigorous eight-week schedule of rehearsals, recitals, opera productions, cabarets and performances such as Saturday night. It is the oldest continuous summer opera company in the country and a point of artistic pride for this community. Please join us for this joyful, beautiful and stylish concert in the Amphitheater.