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All Star afternoon: Jamestown Tarp Skunks visit grounds to square off against Chautauqua All Stars

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KRISTEN TRIPLETT – STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The Jamestown Tarp Skunks play the Chautauqua All Star team on Monday July 19, 2021 at the softball field. KRISTEN TRIPLETT/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Chautauqua softball is always a competitive affair, but Chautauquans faced a unique challenge Monday: taking on the Jamestown Tarp Skunks, the local franchise of the Perfect Game Collegiate Baseball League. Chautauqua’s finest, dubbed the All Stars, faced the Tarp Skunks in a five-inning exhibition match at Sharpe Field. 

The All Stars came out to an early lead, putting up four runs in the first inning, but were ultimately undone by a third inning Tarp Skunks rally. The Tarp Skunks won 11-9. 

After the game, members of the community were invited to take a turn at the plate. Young and young-at-heart Chautauquans took their swings (and a few misses) to cap off a memorable afternoon at the ball field.

  • Kevin Koziol of the Jamestown Tarp Skunks pitches during their game against the Chautauqua All Stars Monday July 19, 2021 at the softball field KRISTEN TRIPLETT/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
  • Posey Wannop goes up to bat after the 5th inning Monday July 19, 2021 at the softball field KRISTEN TRIPLETT/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
  • Charlie Nichols of the Jamestown Tarp Skunks during their game against the Chautauqua All Stars Monday July 19, 2021 at the softball field KRISTEN TRIPLETT/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
  • Nicholas and Patrick Ritacco hold the flag during the National Anthem Monday July 19, 2021 at the softball field KRISTEN TRIPLETT/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
  • Will McEvoy bats for the Chautauqua All Stars Monday July 19, 2021 at the softball field KRISTEN TRIPLETT/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
  • Nate Chub of the Chautauqua All Stars watches a play from third base during their game against the Jamestown Tarp Skunks Monday July 19, 2021 at Sharpe Field. KRISTEN TRIPLETT/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
  • Team members from the Jamestown Tarp Skunks watch the game unfold Monday July 19, 2021 at the softball field KRISTEN TRIPLETT/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Good clean fun: Children’s School hosts Art in the Park

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  • The Children's School hosts Art in the Park on Thursday July 15, 2021 on Bestor Plaza KRISTEN TRIPLETT/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
  • Teddy Spahr paints during the Children's School Art in the Park event on Thursday July 15, 2021 on Bestor Plaza KRISTEN TRIPLETT/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
  • Gael Griffith, left, and Miles Corporandy study one another during a draw each other activity at an Art in the Park event on Thursday July 15, 2021 on Bestor Plaza KRISTEN TRIPLETT/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
  • The Blue Room from the Children's School paint a large canvas during Art in the Park on Thursday July 15, 2021 on Bestor Plaza KRISTEN TRIPLETT/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
  • Leigh van Straaten and Annabel Burry get ready to paint during an Art in the Park event hosted by the Children's School on Thursday July 15, 2021 on Bestor Plaza KRISTEN TRIPLETT/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
  • Chautauqua Institution President Michael E. Hill says hello to the children during the Children's School Art in the Park event on Thursday July 15, 2021 on Bestor Plaza KRISTEN TRIPLETT/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
  • Isabelle Lyndall shows off art paint hands during the Children's School Art in the Park event on Thursday July 15, 2021 on Bestor Plaza KRISTEN TRIPLETT/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
  • Gilbert Reeve paints during the Children's School Art in the Park event on Thursday July 15, 2021 on Bestor Plaza KRISTEN TRIPLETT/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Children’s School Blue Room students paint a large canvas during Art in the Park Thursday on Bestor Plaza. The children, decked out in smocks and oversized shirts, spent the afternoon expressing their creativity on paper and canvas (and the occasional hand, arm, and leg).

A show of excellence: Piano Competition Winners’ Recital

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  • Chautauqua Piano Program Competition Winners, from left, Jung-eun Kim, Andrew Chen, and Charles Berofsky receive a standing ovation from the audience after performing Sunday, July 11, 2021 on the Amphitheater stage. DAVE MUNCH/PHOTO EDITOR
  • Chautauqua Piano Program Competition winner Andrew Chen performs Sunday, July 11, 2021 on the Amphitheater stage. DAVE MUNCH/PHOTO EDITOR
  • Chautauqua Piano Program Competition runner-up Charles Berofsky performs Sunday, July 11, 2021 on the Amphitheater stage. DAVE MUNCH/PHOTO EDITOR
  • Chautauqua Piano Program Competition Jung-eun Kim, who placed third, performs Sunday, July 11, 2021 on the Amphitheater stage. DAVE MUNCH/PHOTO EDITOR

Ceramic creations: Special Studies courses offer colorful outlet

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KRISTEN TRIPLETT – STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

  • From left to right, Fran Goodwin, Colleen Law, Sue Eluard, Sophie Van Seventer, Camille Van Seventer, and Adilene Rosales talk while putting wax on their clay creations during a beginner ceramics class on Thursday June 30, 2021 in the Art Quad. KRISTEN TRIPLETT/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
  • Ceramic instructor Wes Hart unloads the kiln after firing students work overnight on Friday July 1, 2021 in the Art Quad. KRISTEN TRIPLETT/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
  • Ceramic instructor Adilene Rosales holds one of the student's finished pieces on Friday July 2, 2021 in the Art Quad. KRISTEN TRIPLETT/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
  • Ceramic instructors Wes Hart and Adilene Rosales unload the kiln that the student's creations fired in on Friday July 1, 2021 in the Art Quad. KRISTEN TRIPLETT/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
  • Merel Latour studies the various colors before glazing her clay work on Thursday June 30, 2021. KRISTEN TRIPLETT/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
  • Glaze samples sit on one of the countertops at a beginner ceramics class July 1st, 2021. KRISTEN TRIPLETT/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
  • A beginner class works on ceramics in the art quad July 1st, 2021. KRISTEN TRIPLETT/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
  • Instructor, Wes Hart, shows student, Colleen Law, how to dip her bowl into the glaze during a beginner class on Thursday July 1, 2021 in the Art Quad. KRISTEN TRIPLETT/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Each weekday, people of all ages and skill levels come together to learn ceramics in the Arts Quad. This is a time for Chautauquans to learn a new skill, express their creativity, and make new friends. Whether they want to make a dish, a pencil holder, or a custom creation, the opportunities are limitless.

The classes, offered through Chautauqua Special Studies, are held Monday through Friday. Students are guided through the entire ceramics process, from throwing to glazing, then take home their finished creation.

An American moment: Chautauqua celebrates being together again for July 4

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  • Alex Mathews, bass-baritone, performs during the Independence Day celebration on Saturday July 3, 2021 in the Amphitheater. KRISTEN TRIPLETT/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
  • The American Flag unfurls from the Amphitheater ceiling as guest conductor William Eddins leads the Music School Festival Orchestra in “Stars and Stripes Forever” during the Independence Day Celebration Saturday. KRISTEN TRIPLETT/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
  • Guest Conductor Williams Eddins interacts with the crowd during the Independence Day Celebration on Saturday July 3, 2021 in the Amphitheater. KRISTEN TRIPLETT/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
  • Parks Zachry, 6, waves her flag high above the crowd Sunday, July 4, 2021 while listening to the Chautauqua Community Band’s Fourth of July Concert with her dad Andrew Zachry on Bestor Plaza. DAVE MUNCH/PHOTO EDITOR
  • From left, Dan Reeder, Maddy Reeder, 5, Amina Hagner, 6, and Carol Reeder show their patriotic spirit Sunday, July 4, 2021 while listening to the Chautauqua Community Band’s Fourth of July Concert on Bestor Plaza. DAVE MUNCH/PHOTO EDITOR
  • Chautauquans fill Bestor Plaza Sunday, July 4, 2021 for the Chautauqua Community Band’s Fourth of July Concert. DAVE MUNCH/PHOTO EDITOR

The conductor raises his baton to the ceiling, the orchestra comes to the crescendo of “Stars and Stripes Forever,” and the American Flag unfurls above the stage as the audience rises to its feet in applause. For many Chautauquans it is the quintessential Fourth of July moment, one they look forward to each year. While this year’s Independence Day festivities were a bit different than years past — with guest conductor William Eddins holding the baton, and the Music School Festival Orchestra and Chautauqua Voice Program taking the stage for the annual Independence Day Celebration in the Amp — the weekend signaled a joyous return of some of Chautauqua’s most beloved traditions, of families and fireworks, of celebration and community, in a gathering that President Theodore Roosevelt once described as “typical of America at its best.” 

Home at last: After a year of COVID separation, Chautauquans at last return home to grounds – and each other

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Chautauqua has always been about convening. After a year spent socially distanced, Chautauquans are finally able to come together once more in the community they all love.

All across the grounds, families are holding picnics, Chautauquans are engaging in conversations on porches and benches, once-empty homes are filled with life, and friends old and new are being reunited, many having not seen each other since the 2019 Summer Assembly Season. 

With Chautauqua Institution President Michael E. Hill’s Three Taps of the Gavel on Sunday, the season has officially begun, and the most essential element of the Chautauqua Experience, Chautauquans themselves, have come to convene for this 148th Summer Assembly. 

It has been a long and painful road, but Chautauquans who have waited two years for this moment are finally home at last.

  • From left to right, Hank Semmelhack, Lucia Mouat and Tricia Semmelhack sit on a bench to discuss the day's events, Sunday, June 27, 2021 on Bestor Plaza. KRISTEN TRIPLETT/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
  • Steve Drabant and his wife Sue Drabant, left, go through photos with brother-in-law Safwat Andrawes during a family picnic by the Miller Bell Tower Thursday, June 17, 2021. Long time Chautauquans Steve and Sue were showing around Safwat, who is on the grounds for the first time visiting from Kenya. KRISTEN TRIPLETT/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
  • From left to right, Regan Sims and Portia Rose greet Kathy Greenhouse at a local Play "Read-In" on June 24, 2021. KRISTEN TRIPLETT/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
  • From left to right, Nafi Sall, Michael Furman, Dylan Baker, Macy Veto and Elena Stanley talk during an afternoon picnic on Bastor Plaza on June 23, 2021. The group are all interns for the International Order of the Kings Daughters and Sons. KRISTEN TRIPLETT/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
  • Linda Bunch works to help prep her daughter's inn for the summer season while her grandson, Sam Webler, keeps her company in Chautauqua, June 21, 2021. KRISTEN TRIPLETT/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

SLIDESHOW: Chautauqua celebrates Independence Day

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Photos | Demetrius Freeman and Ellie Haugsby and Greg Funka

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Photo 1 – Demetrius Freeman: Nancy Brewer from Los Angeles, Calif., celebrates her Fourth of July with her dog Lucy Ricardo at the Chautauqua Institution. She has been coming to Chautauqua for 28 seasons.

Photo 2 – Demetrius Freeman: Lynn Stahl from San Antonio, Texas, has been coming to Chautauqua since 1998.

Photo 3 – Demetrius Freeman: Marilyn and Jack Carpenter. Marilyn has been coming to Chautauqua for 60 years while Jack has been coming for 26. “It’s like home here and we love it,” Marilyn said.

Photo 4 – Demetrius Freeman: Mike and Sarah Vannatta. Sarah has been coming to Chautauqua since 1974 while Mike has been coming since 1991 one year after they met.

Photo 5 – Ellie Haugsby: The Chautauqua Belle sits at dock near the Pier Building on Chautauqua Lake.

Photo 6 – Ellie Haugsby: Spectators filled Bestor Plaza and the surrounding buildings as the Chautauqua Community Band performed a selection of patriotic songs during their 21st annual Independence Day concert.

Photo 7 – Ellie Haugsby: Jason Weintraub conducts the Community Band on Bestor Plaza.

Photo 8 – Greg Funka: A crowd gathers in Bestor Plaza for the Chautauqua Community Band’s 21st Annual Independence Day Concert.

Photo 9 – Greg Funka: Jason Weintraub, conductor of the Chautauqua Community Band, leads the crowd in singing “God Bless America” at the Band’s 21st Annual Independence Day Concert.

Photo 10 – Greg Funka: Stella, Madeleine, and Amira hang out on the Bestor Plaza fountain during the Chautauqua Community Band’s Independence Day Concert.

Photo 11 – Greg Funka: Austin, Grace, Claire, and Tera play on the Bestor Plaza Fountain during the Chautauqua Community Band’s Annual Independence Day Concert.

‘Quite a night’

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Frederick “Pete” Leo Walker II, left, and Jordan Leeper soar into the air during the Chautauqua Dance Salon Thursday evening in the Amphitheater. Photo by Megan Tan.

Janes owns first dance performance of 2011

Anthony Bannon | Guest Reviewer

Maybe you think you understood it and could even situate it within the dance vocabulary of traditional poses, moves, couplings. Perhaps that charge of Sarah Hayes Watson onto the Amphitheater stage seemed like a violation by some primal creature. Maybe you felt comfortable with that association.

I’ll bet, though, that you recognized that Sasha Janes’ stand-up great little dance called “Last Lost Chance” had knocked you off your feet and succeeded in moving you to a place of wonder, even awe, at how someone might imagine — and then fulfill — such amazing ideas for the body in space. Miss that point, and it might well have been your last lost chance. Chances like the one Janes presented don’t come by very often. This was the real thing, and a good bit of the audience knew it, and took to their feet to give it mighty applause.

Again this year, the North Carolina Dance Theatre returned for residence with Chautauqua Dance, and in its tradition for the first week presented a salon with some of the treasures the company has in its stores.

Sasha Janes is the beloved rehearsal director and sometimes guest choreographer. He owned the evening Thursday.

I hope no one has any programmatic meaning for the piece: some psychodramatic explanation about the inner me and the outer you, or babble about quintessential truths and the basic needs.

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Like Absolute Music or Non-Objective Art, “Lost Chance” is about the exquisite practice of the mind and the surprising capacity of the body. It proposes a practice of mind and body that you’d think appropriate for another dimension, another universe, another kind of human.

Yes, Hayes Watson and Anna Gerberich with Jordan Leeper and Pete Walker with Melissa Anduiza created the work, and you’ll run into them on Bestor Plaza or University Beach. They are the company leaders, and no doubt regular folks, but you’ve got to wonder after seeing them dance: “Just who are these creatures? How is this possible — what they do on stage?”

They are that astonishing, committing every fiber to Janes’ equally extraordinary vision.

At one point a voice in Ólafur Arnalds’ score for “Lost Chance” — an odd, electronically manipulated voice — declares the “screaming silence of the mind” and the voice of wind through leaves. Arnalds, an Icelandic composer, moves easily from the classic concert to pop music stage with a variety of instruments and devices and enjoys breaking rules by proposing in his language of sound the absolutely unheard-of wonders that Janes shares in movement.

And then Anna Gerberich makes a twitch, a sudden shudder, that occurs in a millisecond and by surprise and positions a leg over there were it shouldn’t be and summons an awareness of the greedy art of “Lost Chance.” It is a dance about making art — and I think the anxiety of creating something truly new, not knowing just how it will turn out — that is the ultimate subject of great abstraction.

Anduiza centers the work, making brief appearances and piquant gestures to the couples who have left the stage, completing their turn. She runs in long and beautiful strides around the perimeter of the stage, as if to define it, hold it together, sustain its energy.

“Lost Chance” builds from sensuous couplings to sentiment more extreme, Arnald’s music reaching for amplitude and breaking apart, to fall finally into the organ that begins the work.

“Lost Chance” completed the first section of the evening to sustained applause.

Mark Diamond’s work fulfilled the remainder of the evening. Diamond is the program director of the Dance Salon and associate artistic director of North Carolina Dance Theatre, with Jean-Pierre Bonnefoux, artistic director, and Patricia McBride, associate artistic director.

Diamond’s theme for the evening was good and evil, also the title of the opening dance, created to the chilly music of Antonio Vivaldi’s coldest of the “Four Seasons,” a fascinating choice for a vigorous confrontation by Leeper and Walker, the evil part, then ministered by Gerberich soothing the fallen Leeper and ending in a third movement with a compelling construction by Anduiza, Gerberich, Leeper and Walker, in which they struggle to achieve a fitting harmony, only to see it fracture, like broken glass, in a disassembly of an architecture startling for dance.

Diamond lovingly plays into each dancer’s strength; for instance, his utilization of the art nouveau lines that Gerberich so beautifully assumes through her body, in motion and still amazingly creating the sinewy, haunted line of last century’s avant-garde, from forehead to extremity, finger to foot.

The theme of good and evil continues in a piece called “The Advocate,” a narrative of power and submission, of threat and persuasion that works equally for an exorcism as for the development of Fascism. Kate Behrendt, Hayes Watson, David Morse and Daniel Rodriguez perform.

Following intermission, Diamond opened with a reprise of the The Thorn Birds, Colleen McCullough’s novel about priestly dalliance that became what still is the second-most popular television mini-series (after “Roots”).

Well, not really, but how many narratives are there that engage the confusion between godly and carnal love? This is one, with Leeper and Hayes Watson as the star-crossed lovers. The strength of characterization that Hayes Watson brings to every performance — her total conviction, from grace to passion, at every moment of the piece, called “Sunset Road” after the Bela Fleck tune, carries the conceptually thin work home.

The evening ended with a featured role for the company’s third great woman, Anduiza, playing the soul of Japanese tradition, the temperance behind conflict, a unifying principle, an ultimate balance that becomes corrupted and ultimately destroyed, raped by vulgarity and violence. She is extraordinary, through a range of sensibilities, and her men — Greg DeArmond, Rodriguez and Walker — spent more testosterone than should be legal for a dance floor. Music, appropriately, was the drumming of Leonard Eto, “Zoku.”

Quite a night.

Anthony Bannon is the Ron and Donna Fielding Director of the George Eastman House, the International Museum of Photography and Film in Rochester, NY. He had been a dance and theater critic for The Buffalo News.