Posts Tagged 'Featured'

This offseason: A path to a greener Chautauqua, strewn with boulders

This offseason: A path to a greener Chautauqua, strewn with boulders

Chautauquans will recall that the Institution received federal and New York state grants totaling more than $700,000 in 2011 to support efforts to better manage stormwater runoff and to help keep Chautauqua Lake free of phosphates and other harmful nutrients.

One of the signature elements in the Institution’s plan to spend the grant money most effectively is a wetlands project near the tee on the third hole of Chautauqua Golf Club’s Lake Course. The wetlands project has taken visible shape during the 2013 Season.

The World of Bestor Plaza, the free-form heart of Chautauqua

The World of Bestor Plaza, the free-form heart of Chautauqua

A young boy blows bubbles on Bestor Plaza. One makes it past the squealing children and over the trees. Viewed from above, the bubble is a small world, encapsulating the plaza below in a psychedelic snowglobe.

The inhabitants of the bubble are free to do what makes them happy. Whistling balloon rockets and hovering frisbees make the airspace look like a futuristic highway, complete with flying saucers and soaring airships. [w/ SLIDESHOW]

Franklin begins as Chautauqua’s worship leader on Sunday

Franklin begins as Chautauqua’s worship leader on Sunday

“I am wrestling with my inaugural sermon. It is a time of a divided heart, to say thanks to Joan for extending her gifts and graces and publically receive the baton. [The sermon] is a point in time to build on and extend the Campbell legacy,” the Rev. Robert Franklin said.

It was Week Three, and Franklin was sitting on the patio of the Brick Walk Cafe reflecting on his future as the incoming director of Chautauqua Institution’s Department of Religion.

Fink caps final week with lecture on medical ethics after natural disasters

Fink caps final week with lecture on medical ethics after natural disasters

Hurricanes in the Northeast, tornadoes in the deep South and earthquakes in California are among the recent natural disasters that have caused millions of dollars in damage and affected countless lives. Dr. Sheri Fink has reported on such catastrophes and has provided insights on how American hospitals prepare and administer help for these disasters.

Fink is the author of the upcoming release Five Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a Storm-Ravaged Hospital, an account of New Orleans’s Memorial Medical Center in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina — more specifically, the medical ethics displayed in the wake of the disaster. She will discuss her book at 3 p.m. Saturday in the Hall of Philosophy, the final lecture of the season in the Chautauqua Women’s Club Contemporary Issues Forum speaker series.

Better than a Hallelujah: Grant returns to Chautauqua to perform songs new and old, with family

Better than a Hallelujah: Grant returns to Chautauqua to perform songs new and old, with family

In 2004, the last time Amy Grant performed at Chautauqua, she brought her bike. She may be a six-time Grammy Award-winning singer, but, when it comes to biking, she considers herself more of a Katherine Hepburn than a Lance Armstrong.

“I certainly don’t have the kind of expendable income that would allow me to travel on a whim,” Grant said, “but because I travel with work … I’ve been to maybe a hundred different cities in a year. And sometimes some pretty remote and amazing parts of the country, and that’s why I take my bike; that’s why we try to hike or look around.”

Dentzer: Post-acute care key to improving U.S. health system

Dentzer: Post-acute care key to improving U.S. health system

A projection of Michelangelo’s David stared down at the Amphitheater audience from behind Susan Dentzer as she spoke at Friday’s morning lecture. But this wasn’t quite the perfectly proportioned model of a man that has wowed countless numbers of tourists in Italy. An apparently unhealthy dose of Photoshop had added a massive gut and sagging pectorals to the famed piece of art.

“Somebody got the bright idea to send him off to a two-month trip in the United States,” Dentzer joked. “He’s just not the svelte young Florentine he used to be — he’s an American.”

Puchalski: ‘Healing is not one of only mechanical repair but one of regaining relatedness itself’

Puchalski: ‘Healing is not one of only mechanical repair but one of regaining relatedness itself’

Medical patients have physical needs as well as spiritual ones. And Dr. Christina Puchalski doesn’t believe health care professionals should limit themselves to just the former.

She said that 73 percent of cancer patients said they’ve experienced at least one instance of spiritual need; 40 percent of newly diagnosed cancer patients said they have a significant level of spiritual distress.

Impressionist Staggs uses laughter for medicine

Impressionist Staggs uses laughter for medicine

The Rev. Al Staggs can trace his love of comedic performance back to one moment when he was 17: His mother, who suffered from lifelong depression related to an abusive, alcoholic husband and the early deaths of her parents, was ironing bed sheets with a sad expression on her face. To cheer her up, Staggs jumped in front of her and impersonated comedian Jonathan Winters’ grandmotherly character Maude Frickert, wearing a wig, high heels and a dress. His mother laughed so hard that she sobbed.

For eighth year, Archives to celebrate Chautauqua Giants

For eighth year, Archives to celebrate Chautauqua Giants

There are many giants at Chautauqua — not measured by physical stature, wealth, size of house or material possessions, but by the contributions they have made to the Chautauqua community. Now in its eighth year, a celebration of five Chautauqua Giants will commence at 3:30 p.m. today in the Hall of Christ. The presentation is part of the Oliver Archives Heritage Lecture Series.

The event first occurred in 2006 as part of a week themed “Five Giants.” Jon Schmitz, Chautauqua archivist and historian, said that Tom Becker asked him to do a presentation on the “Giants of Chautauqua.” Schmitz, in turn, asked five people to choose five Chautauquans, “living or dead, famous or unknown, people they knew or never met, and to say a few words about why they believe they made a special contribution to Chautauqua.”