Posts Tagged 'Martin Luther King Jr.'

‘A Raisin in the Sun’ sets the stage for conversation on race at Chautauqua

‘A Raisin in the Sun’ sets the stage for conversation on race at Chautauqua

A Raisin in the Sun is an American story. A story about family, generational change, ambition — and racial discrimination. Chautauqua Theater Company’s production of Lorraine Hansberry’s play represents several firsts. It’s the first time a black female playwright will be produced in Bratton Theater. It’s also the first time that CTC’s conservatory features more than 50 percent non-white actors.

Warnock: ‘Theology that has not lived is not theology at all’

Warnock: ‘Theology that has not lived is not theology at all’

The phrase “black theology” appeared in the national conversation during the 2008 presidential race, when a video clip of President Barack Obama’s former pastor, the Rev. Jeremiah Wright, began to circulate. The video showed Wright delivering a sermon to his congregation at Trinity United Church of Christ in Chicago, at one point shouting “God damn America.” What resulted was a barrage of attacks on the would-be president and his pastor.

“For those who were beginning to open themselves up to the idea of a President Obama, this strange black theology and this barely understood black church was most unwelcome in the new post-racial America some believed had suddenly emerged,” said the Rev. Raphael Warnock, senior pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta.

Dyson: Without failures, there can be no revolutions

Dyson: Without failures, there can be no revolutions

I am not a radical, but I lived through radical changes. Radical changes are exciting for the old and intoxicating for the young. I was lucky to be in Washington in the summer of 1963 when a quarter of a million black Americans marched for freedom and justice. I marched with them to the Lincoln Memorial and heard Martin Luther King uplifting them with his “I Have a Dream” speech, talking like an Old Testament prophet.

Also uplifting them were groups of young marchers carrying banners saying where they came from. The marchers from the really tough places — Birmingham, Ala., and Albany, Ga. — where the battles for civil rights had been raging, were very young, hardly more than children. In the toughest places, people with family responsibilities could not afford to take chances. From those places, only young people came. Most of them had never been away from their homes before. They had been fighting lonely battles. They had never known that they had so many friends. They looked like the hope of the future as they danced and sang their freedom songs with bright faces and sparkling eyes.