Tag Archives: Oliver Archives
Courtesy of Chautauqua Institution ArchivesThe Chautauqua Amphitheater, circa 1959.

Chautauqua: Rumors of its decline have been greatly exaggerated

What goes up must come down, so goes the saying. But in matters as complex as human life or, say, Chautauqua Institution, it may be better described as rising and declining. In talking about the Institution, Jon Schmitz, Chautauqua archivist and historian, will add resurgence to his 3:30 p.m. lecture today in the Hall of Christ.

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Five Giants Stand Tall — as do those who commemorate them

It has become something of a tradition, the Oliver Archives’ presentation of “Five More Giants of Chautauqua” at 3:30 p.m. today in the Hall of Christ. To be asked to select a giant, a person has to “get it,” said Jon Schmitz, Institution historian and archivist, referring to the panel of people who chose figures of Chautauqua history to honor.

Of course, there are many, many significant figures who have contributed to the founding, success and longevity of Chautauqua Institution — figures such as Arthur Bestor, Sam Hazlett, Ida Tarbell, Dan Bratton and more. This year, there will be five giants more.

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A measure of leadership: The power of words

It might be Ronald Reagan demanding the Soviets “Tear down this wall.” Or Martin Luther King Jr. proclaiming, “I have a dream.” Or Franklin Delano Roosevelt saying, “Yesterday, December 7, 1941 — a date which will live in infamy — the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan.” In these cases, as in many more, Robert Bullock, of the New York State Archives Partnership Trust, admires the power of words.

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Orlando holy land theme park popularizes ancient sacred space

It is a re-creation of sacred space, Joan Branham said. At the same time it is, somewhat paradoxically, a recreation of sacred space. Branham is professor of art history at Providence College and a specialist on sacred space in ancient Jewish and Christian art and architecture.

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Archives lecture to trace history of traditions

Gladiolas, fireworks, Old First Night, Bryant Day — and there are more, some of them beginning even as we speak: traditions at Chautauqua. Jon Schmitz, archivist and historian at Chautauqua Institution, will ferret out the origins of Chautauqua traditions in a presentation at 3:30 p.m. today in the Hall of Christ: “True Tales, Tall Tales, Trivia and Traditions of Chautauqua.”

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Banners, postcards, mosaics, cartoons de rigueur at Archives

The Chautauqua Oliver Archives Center can be a quiet place — all those dusty documents. But not today, when it hosts an absolute plethora of people and purposes: a banner tour with information on how those relics are restored and cared for; Jon Schmitz and Bill Flanders, signing and selling their book in the Postcard History Series: Chautauqua Institution; and Ed Harmon, signing and selling his most recent compilation of “Well, That’s Chautauqua,” cartoons, satires and spoofs of life on the grounds.

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Hymn singing at Chautauqua: A dance between world wars

History comes in many voicings, and today at 3:30 p.m. in Hurlbut Memorial Community United Methodist Church, as part of the Oliver Archives Heritage Lecture Series, Jared Jacobsen, organist and coordinator of worship and sacred music, and Marlie Bendiksen, Archives research assistant, will do just that — provide history in voice and song. And they’ll add in something of a dance component, as the title of their presentation indicates: “The Dance That We Do: Hymns We Were Singing In 1931.”

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Lecture to recall historic ‘I Hate War’ speech

It might be that the name, Mary Frances Bestor Cram, is a mouthful. On the other hand, she had a lot to say. Her father, Arthur Bestor, presided over Chautauqua for some 30 years — through two world wars and the Depression. One remarkable event during those years was Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s visit to Chautauqua in August 1936, when he gave his “I Hate War” speech.

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