Posts Tagged 'Oliver Archives'

The Women Behind the Memorials: Eleanor Roosevelt: A woman of Chautauqua

The Women Behind the Memorials: Eleanor Roosevelt: A woman of Chautauqua

There are three observations, among many, gleaned from reading The Chautauquan Daily reporting of Eleanor Roosevelt’s eight visits to Chautauqua from 1927-1937. First: how farsighted her concerns and comments were, particularly in the July 7, 1930, and the July 25, 1933, speeches. Second: the reporting, which inadvertently describes the contrast in the freedom of movement Roosevelt enjoyed to the impenetrable gauze of security which wraps national political figures today. Third: how vivid and observant the reporting was, especially Elizabeth Hall’s July 26, 1933, Daily “Ground Wires” column.

The Women Behind the Memorials: The woman who bought the Amphitheater

The Women Behind the Memorials: The woman who bought the Amphitheater

Geraldine Gebbie Bellinger bought Chautauqua’s Amphitheater in 1935. Well, to be precise, she joined her daughter, Janet, and sister, Marion Bertram Gebbie, and made a $5,000 sentimental purchase of the Amp. It was a donation to the “Save Chautauqua Fund” and was one of the larger single contributions to the three-year effort to rescue the Institution from its creditors.

Five Giants Stand Tall — as do those who commemorate them

Five Giants Stand Tall — as do those who commemorate them

It has become something of a tradition, the Oliver Archives’ presentation of “Five More Giants of Chautauqua” at 3:30 p.m. today in the Hall of Christ. To be asked to select a giant, a person has to “get it,” said Jon Schmitz, Institution historian and archivist, referring to the panel of people who chose figures of Chautauqua history to honor.

Of course, there are many, many significant figures who have contributed to the founding, success and longevity of Chautauqua Institution — figures such as Arthur Bestor, Sam Hazlett, Ida Tarbell, Dan Bratton and more. This year, there will be five giants more.

A measure of leadership: The power of words

A measure of leadership: The power of words

It might be Ronald Reagan demanding the Soviets “Tear down this wall.” Or Martin Luther King Jr. proclaiming, “I have a dream.” Or Franklin Delano Roosevelt saying, “Yesterday, December 7, 1941 — a date which will live in infamy — the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan.” In these cases, as in many more, Robert Bullock, of the New York State Archives Partnership Trust, admires the power of words.